Amy Fox

Writer. Editor. Feminist knitting designer.


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Introducing Solidarity (the knitting pattern)

Solidarity hat Katie

The beautiful, smart and funny journalist Katie Davies, rocking the hat over Christmas.

I’m so excited to announce that my very first *official* feminist knitting pattern is now on sale at LoveKnitting.com – and that I will be donating half the profits to Women’s Aid. Check it out here!

The Solidarity hat was inspired by two things. Firstly, as with so many designs, it was all in the yarn. Mirasol Miski a beautiful 100% baby llama in a soft green which I instantly knew I wanted to pair with a snowy cream (the two together remind me a little of my grandmother’s wallpaper from the 1970s).

Secondly, it was the 2014 Feminism in London conference, in which there was a lot of talk about how feminism is not just individual to each person, but a movement of togetherness – of women joining together to make change, much like the craftivists who attended and spoke at the event.

It was this idea which inspired the interlinked Venus symbols which make up the body of the hat’s Fair Isle pattern. They don’t just represent craftivists or even just feminists, but all women – the women in my own family and friendship circles, who are constantly inspiring me; the women of the past who were saved from poverty by their ability to make a living from their knitting; the millions of women around the world who feel like they are fighting a losing battle against oppression. If we don’t stand together and support each other, how can we possibly hope for change?

One of my oldest and most wonderful friends Phanida, who is months away from becoming an actual medical doctor. Bow down.

One of my oldest and most wonderful friends, Phanida Fung, who is months away from becoming an actual medical doctor. Also she looks super cute here.

And with all that in mind, I am so happy to be donating half the profits from the Solidarity hat to Women’s Aid, to help end domestic violence against women in children (unfortunately the other half is still needed for the “helping Amy pay her rent” fund – one day we may all live in a post-capitalist society in which I can afford to give away my patterns for free, but sadly today is not that day).

With thanks to Katie Davies and Phanida Fung, my two brilliant models and friends; the wonderful designer Jane Burns for her excellent advice, friendship and pattern-checking skills; and Loveknitting.com for helping independent designers to navigate the murky waters of VATMOSS.

Detailed shot of the Fair Isle pattern.

Detailed shot of the Fair Isle pattern.

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What is a feminist knitting designer?

Yarn and business cards

When I decided to go freelance last year, the first thing I got excited about was the business cards. I instantly knew what I wanted my tagline to be:

writer – editor – feminist knitting designer

“Are you sure?” asked my father, looking at the design. “Don’t you want it to be a bit more… professional?”

“It’s memorable,” was my reply. “People will see it and they’ll just have to ask me about it. And then when they actually need a writer or an editor, they’ll remember me!”

So… what does it mean to be a feminist knitting designer?

Well, it’s simple, really. It means that I’m a feminist and I’m a knitting designer, and that I sometimes try to combine the two.

Outside of the crafts world, there can sometimes be a bit of a tendency to look down on knitters and stitchers and cupcake bakers as being un-feminist. Germaine Greer famously said that “women have frittered their lives away stitching things for which there is no demand.” After all, didn’t we leave that kind of thing behind in the 1950s? Aren’t we just perpetuating unhelpful stereotypes of essential femininity? And so on.

Well… no. For me, there’s something very feminist about making things with your own hands and reconnecting with your creativity and your past. It doesn’t have to be expensive – you can pick up balls of yarn for little more than a quid – and it’s a skill that has been passed down through mothers and daughters for generations. My own mother taught me to knit when I was about 13, and my great-grandmother was a professional knitter; I still use her old needles from time to time. When my family traced back our family tree a few years ago, we also found at least one male ancestor who was a framework knitter in Leicester, my hometown.

And while that personal connection is not always the case for many people nowadays, all it takes is a quick google search to find hundreds of workshops, blogs and YouTube videos – predominantly by women – which are passing on that knowledge too.*

Knitting is not a closely guarded secret. It’s a thing that makes people happy, that they love to share with others. There’s no snobbery or nastiness – your first wobbly scarf will be celebrated with as much enthusiasm as your second bit of proper Fair Isle, or your twelfth patchwork blanket.

For me, feminism has always been about celebrating women’s achievements as well as fighting gender inequality – because part of that inequality is that women are conditioned not to celebrate their own achievements. We’re not supposed to boast when we’re good at something or agree when we’re complimented – just to sit quietly, humbly waving away any praise bestowed on us.

Not so in the world of knitting. When I’ve gone to craft shows I have found them full of women and men praising each other’s work without jealousy or bitterness, excited to show off their latest designs and ideas, encouraging each other to try something new. There’s a release and a satisfaction in an environment which is about supporting each other. It’s peaceful. It’s often environmentally friendly. It’s the kind of safe, warm, creative world that, as a feminist, I would love to become more universal.

And, on the flip side, knitting and other crafts can be thrillingly subversive when they’re used politically. Let’s not forget the many feminist crafters who are doing incredible, important work around the world: the brilliant Wool Against Weapons activists protested Trident last year by knitting a seven-mile long scarf to stretch between two atomic weapons sites in Berkshire, then repurposed the scarf into blankets for people in need; charities like Knit for Peace distribute handknitted items to those who need them most; Stitch n Bitch groups are bringing women together; projects like Significant Seams support vulnerable people in the community. And you know the suffragettes LOVED a hand-stitched banner back in the day.

It was these women, and more, of whom I was thinking when I designed my first official feminist knitting pattern. Stay tuned, guys, it won’t be long now.

*Before you start, of course there is room for men too, and of course eradicating the gender stereotypes around knitting is a thing that would benefit everyone. But at the same time, I get fuzzy feelings about an industry that is full of women working together in relative harmony. What can I say? It’s a paradox that I’m willing to live with for now.


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A summer which I intend to spend blogging: round two

I am going to start blogging again.

These words are, of course, words that the internet – the poor, content-saturated internet, which must find the idea of sharing and reblogging utterly exhausting – has heard before.

But as I was scrolling through Twitter the other day, a conversation between journalists Mary Hamilton and Adam Tinworth about the importance of blogging started to make me feel guilty. The argument, in summary, was that it is undeniably important to keep writing on the web. It is important creatively, for people who work with words for a living; intellectually, for people who have a lot of ideas and opinions, and for whom writing is a way of refining these; and logically, in a digital world where declaring yourself a writer of any kind without easy-to-find evidence is a pretty avoidable mistake to make.

Also, for reasons I will get to in a minute, I am desperate to write about something that isn’t yarn.

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